Medical Marijuana

Missouri: Election day is here — vote YES on Amendment 2!

Have you voted yet? If not, look up your polling location and make a plan to get there before 7 p.m. when the polls close!

Voting is one of the most important tools we have to change marijuana laws. Sitting out an election is a great way to ensure that failed prohibitionist policies remain in place.

Today Missourians have an opportunity to vote on not one, but three different medical marijuana initiatives. MPP encourages voters to say “YES” on Amendment 2, because it will enshrine a sensible and compassionate medical marijuana program in the state constitution, making it harder for state politicians to undermine it later.

Today, be one of the millions of Americans voicing their support for humane and rational marijuana policies through the ballot box. Grab a few friends and get out there and VOTE!

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Medical Marijuana

Florida Medical Marijuana Regulations Bill Signed

On Friday, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed medical marijuana regulation legislation into law. The legislature passed SB 8A in a special session after the regular session ended without a bill to implement Amendment 2, which legalized medical marijuana and was supported by 71% of voters last year.

The new law outlines licensing for 10 new companies as growers by October, which would increase the statewide total to 17. The law also allows patients, with a doctor’s recommendation, to use medical marijuana in the form of pills, oils, and edibles. Patients may engage in vaping, but unfortunately, the law does ban smoking.

Additionally, the Department of Health is simultaneously working to regulate the amendment. Spokeswoman Mara Gambineri says the department is crafting rules to comply with SB 8A, “which provides a framework for patients to access marijuana safely.”

Amendment 2 gives health officials until July 3 to craft rules to regulate the amendment and until October 3 to implement those rules.

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Medical Marijuana

Florida Legislature Fails to Implement Medical Marijuana Initiative, Leaving it to Health Officials

May 08, 2017 Mason Tvert

Amendment 2, Florida

The Florida legislative session ended without a medical marijuana implementation bill being passed. As a result,  state health officials will now have to implement Amendment 2, the initiative approved last November by more than 71% of voters.

According to a report from the News Service of Florida:

A potential deal collapsed Friday evening after the House amended its proposal (HB 1397) to impose a cap of 100 retail outlets for each of the state's medical marijuana operators, over the objections of some Democrats. The Senate had proposed a cap of 10, at least for now.

The Florida Department of Health now has until next month to issue regulations for implementation of Amendment 2. Unfortunately, the Department of Health’s proposed guidelines, circulated earlier this year, are too restrictive and inconsistent with the overwhelmingly popular amendment. MPP submitted public comments criticizing the Department’s proposed regulations.

If you reside in Florida, please contact the Department of Health’s Office of Compassionate Use and request that regulations be focused on patient access and market accessibility. Specifically, tell the Department of Health to:

  1. Allow physician recommendations without requiring doctors to specify a type or quantity of medical marijuana;
  2. Permit patients to use medical marijuana by smoking, vaping, or consuming edibles; and
  3. Avoid any limitation on the doctor-patient relationship and allow doctors to recommend after a reasonable assessment.

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Medical Marijuana

Florida Medical Marijuana Initiative Endorsed by National and State Epilepsy Foundations

United for Care, the Florida group campaigning to pass an effective medical marijuana ballot initiate on election day, recently announced endorsements from state and national epilepsy organizations.ef

Florida Politics reports:

The Florida Epilepsy Foundation has endorsed proposed Amendment 2, the medical marijuana initiative on Florida’s Nov. 8 ballot.

“Important medical decisions, such as treatments and medications, should be made by licensed physicians who know their patients best. That’s why the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida, along with the national Epilepsy Foundation, supports Amendment 2,” Karen Basha Egozi, chief executive officer of the organization, said Tuesday in a written statement.

“Florida’s epilepsy patients should have available whatever treatment options their doctors recommend, including medical marijuana,” she said.

The proposal would allow cannabis use by people “with debilitating medical conditions as determined by a licensed Florida physician.”

It provides legal protections for caregivers helping them administer the drug, subject to oversight by the state Department of Health.

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Medical Marijuana

First Dispensaries to Open in Florida, but Most Patients Still Left Behind

The first dispensary in Florida to offer low-THC medical marijuana products is expected to open in Tallahassee on Tuesday. Unfortunately, there are still huge flaws in Florida’s law. Dispensaries may be opening up, but for most patients, the doors are still shut.YesOn2Florida

First, only low-THC marijuana will be available, and only patients with cancer, seizures, or severe and persistent muscle spasms will qualify, leaving many patients behind. Although cannabis with more THC will eventually be available, it will only be for terminally ill patients.

Second, doctors are required to “order” a specific amount of cannabis, which is perilously close to prescribing it. This puts doctors at risk of violating federal law, and we expect that it will be very difficult for patients to find doctors willing to take this risk, which is why MPP does not classify Florida as a true medical marijuana state.

The best way to fix these problems is to support United for Care’s efforts to pass Amendment 2, which would create an effective medical program for Florida.

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Medical Marijuana||Prohibition||Tax and Regulate

Marijuana is Now Legal in Alaska, Oregon, South Portland, Maine, and the Nation’s Capital

Voters in two states, the fourth largest city in Maine, and the nation’s capital approved ballot measures to end marijuana prohibition and implement more sensible marijuana policies, capping off a historic election year for marijuana policy reform.

Alaska and Oregon are now the third and fourth states to regulate and tax marijuana like alcohol, following Colorado and Washington. As of early this morning, Oregon’s Measure 91 led 54-46 with 75% of the votes counted. Alaska’s Ballot Measure 2 led 52-48 with 97% of the state’s precincts reporting.

Voters in South Portland, Maine approved Question 2 52-48 as well, making it the second East Coast city to make marijuana legal for adult use at the local level. A similar ballot measure in Lewiston, Maine came in close; it received 45% of the vote and did not pass.

In Washington, D.C., voters approved Initiative 71 by an overwhelming margin of 65-28, removing all penalties for the possession and home cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana by adults.

Moreover, an overwhelming majority of Florida voters — 58% — approved Amendment 2, which would have allowed patients with serious and debilitating conditions access to medical marijuana upon a physician’s recommendation. Unfortunately, the measure failed to pass because Florida state law requires 60% support for approval.

Nonetheless, yesterday’s historic election was largely successful and demonstrated that American citizens are ready to end marijuana prohibition in the country for good.

We will update the details of election results if new data becomes available.

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Medical Marijuana||Prohibition||Tax and Regulate

Today is Election Day!

Today, states, cities, and the nation’s capital will be voting on marijuana policy ballot measures.

Alaska and Oregon are considering statewide ballot measures that would make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it similarly to alcohol. If Ballot Measure 2 in Alaska and Measure 91 in Oregon are approved, Alaska and Oregon would be the third and fourth states in the U.S. to end marijuana prohibition.

In Washington D.C., voters are considering Initiative 71, which would make possession of up to two ounces of marijuana legal for adults 21 and older, as well as allow adults to cultivate up to six plants in their homes. Two of Maine’s largest cities — Lewiston and South Portland — are also considering citywide ballot measures that would make marijuana legal for adults.

In addition, Florida could become the 24th state to allow people with debilitating illnesses and conditions to access marijuana upon a physician’s recommendation, if voters pass Amendment 2.

Smaller local marijuana policy initiatives and ballot questions are also being considered in many cities across the country.

Needless to say, today is a very important! Please go out and vote to help end marijuana prohibition and implement sensible marijuana policies around the nation. Encourage neighbors, friends, and relatives to do the same! For more Election Day information, please visit headcount.org.

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Medical Marijuana

Florida Voters Only a Week Away From Decision to Make Medical Marijuana Legal

Although recent weeks have shown that Amendment 2 — the initiative to make medical marijuana legal throughout the state of Florida — was in danger of failing to pass, a new poll conducted in the past week by public opinion research firm Anzalone Liszt Grove shows that Amendment 2 is still likely to pass come November 4.

Amendment 2 needs 60% support for passage, which would allow medical marijuana in the Sunshine State. The recent poll puts support for Amendment 2 at 62%.

Moreover, according to the Anzalone Liszt Grove survey, 62% of likely voters say that they have either already voted yes or will vote yes for Amendment 2, with 35% opposed to the passage of the initiative and 3% still undecided.

“Florida doctors may soon prescribe medical marijuana for those suffering from debilitating diseases. But turnout is important,” writes Anazalone Liszt Grove founder John Anzalone. “If the yes on 2 campaign continues turning out strong supporters to the polls, then medical marijuana can pass statewide.”

Florida residents, please go out and vote on Election Day to allow medical marijuana patients to legally possess and use the medicine that they need. Encourage family, friends, and neighbors to do the same! For voting information and locations, please visit the following website.

Here’s a list of all the state and local marijuana-related ballot measures voters will be considering on Election Day.

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Medical Marijuana

Poll Reveals Where Floridians Stand on Medical Marijuana Amendment

According to a University of North Florida press release, a new statewide poll reveals that 67 percent of likely voters responded that they would vote “yes” for Amendment 2, which would allow the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating illnesses or diseases, if recommended by a licensed physician.

However, as reported by the Jacksonville Business Journal, Floridians are not yet ready to fully end marijuana prohibition. Although they are more open to allowing the use of medical marijuana, they are more or less opposed to allowing the recreational use of the substance. The poll demonstrates that the percentage of likely voters who are against allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for recreational use is at 53 percent.

Below are the full results:

Amendment 2 on the statewide ballot in November is called “Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions.” This amendment allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. If the election were held today, would you vote yes or no for this proposition?

Likely Voters N=  427
Yes 67%
No 28%
DK 5%

 

Do you support or oppose allowing adults in Florida to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for recreational use?

Likely Voters N=  423
Support 44%
Oppose 53%
DK 3%

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