Texas Advocates Release TV Ad Featuring Active Duty Police Officer and Victim of Marijuana Prohibition

May 04, 2017 , , , , , , , , , ,


A television ad in support of a bill to reduce marijuana penalties in Texas will begin airing Friday, just days before the state House of Representatives is expected to vote on the measure. It can be viewed here.

The 30-second spot features Nick Novello, an active duty police officer and 23-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department, and Heather Jackson of Houston, an ovarian cancer survivor who was arrested for possession of a small amount of marijuana in El Paso in 2007.

“Arresting people for marijuana possession does not make our communities any safer,” Novello says in the ad. “It’s a terrible waste of police resources.”

Jackson notes that she was found with less than one gram of marijuana and spent a total of four days in jail. She was initially jailed for two days. She was forced to spend an additional two days in jail because she violated the terms of her probation by traveling from El Paso to Houston for treatment at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“It has affected so many different things in my life,” Jackson says in the ad. She now has a criminal record that has prevented her from getting a teaching job.

The ad concludes by urging viewers to tell their legislators to support HB 81, a bipartisan bill that would remove the threat of arrest, jail time, and a criminal record for possession of up to one ounce of marijuana and replace them with a civil fine of up to $250. A fourth offense would result in a misdemeanor punishable by only a fine. The measure passed out of the House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee last month and is expected to receive a full vote in the House next week.

The ad is scheduled to air through Monday in Austin and through the weekend in Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston on CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC.


2 responses to “Texas Advocates Release TV Ad Featuring Active Duty Police Officer and Victim of Marijuana Prohibition”

  1. I am glad to see more progress in the right direction.

    Having said that, you really need to proofread more.
    “She now has a criminal record that has prevented her from getting a teaching job”
    This is very misleading because she was already on probation, so therefore already had a criminal record. If she already had a criminal record, this incident played no part in her not being able to teach.

    Perhaps her previous charge that resulted in probation was related to our current laws on cannabis, but maybe not. Poor journalism will leave up forever mislead and unknowing of the truth.

  2. I have a small amount of weed charge and now my 125k in student loans, the Federal Government gets the bill. I would have gladly paid it. Yet, look at the retards running the show. When I die I’m haunting every sob involved with ruining my life. Weed charge equals no job, looks like the rednecks have a lot of job openings, a huge deficit, and a lot of haunting coming.

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