Congressmen Form Bipartisan Cannabis Caucus

Feb 22, 2017 , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Jared Polis (D-CO), and Don Young (R-AK) have formed the Congressional Cannabis Caucus to develop and promote sensible cannabis policy reform and work to ease the tension between federal and state cannabis laws.

They represent constituents in four of the eight states that have enacted laws regulating cannabis for medical and adult use. Twenty additional states have enacted comprehensive medical cannabis laws, and 16 additional states have enacted limited or unworkable medical cannabis laws. In total, 44 states have adopted laws rolling back cannabis prohibition at the state level, representing 95% of the U.S. House of Representatives and 88% of the Senate.

The Marijuana Policy Project, the Drug Policy Alliance, the National Cannabis Industry Association, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Americans for Safe Access, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Law Enforcement Action Partnership, Doctors for Cannabis Regulation, and Clergy for a New Drug Policy released a joint statement in support of the formation of this group:

“We commend Representatives Blumenauer, Rohrabacher, Polis, and Young for their leadership on the issue of cannabis policy. The establishment of a Cannabis Caucus will allow members from both parties, who represent diverse constituencies from around the country, to join together for the purpose of advancing sensible cannabis policy reform. It will also facilitate efforts to ease the tension between federal prohibition laws and state laws that regulate cannabis for medical and adult use.

The formation of this caucus is a testament to how far our country has come on the issue of cannabis policy. There is a growing consensus that cannabis prohibition has failed, and it is time for a more sensible approach. A strong majority of Americans support making cannabis legal for medical and adult use, and an even stronger majority believes states should be able to establish their own cannabis policies without interference from the federal government. We look forward to working with caucus members to translate this growing public sentiment into sound public policy.”


6 responses to “Congressmen Form Bipartisan Cannabis Caucus”

  1. What needs to be done as soon as possible is remove cannabis from the schedule 1 listing on the DEA’s list of federal controlled drugs. Right now, too many folks, including seniors, the disabled or others who suffer from various levels of pain are being “punished” by their doctors for using ANY cannabis products, by refusing to refill anymore prescriptions for “narcotic” type medications. Doctors are telling patients, the sole reason this is happening, is because cannabis is a schedule 1 drug on the “federal” level. Schedule 1 drugs are defined as drugs with NO currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. The DEA regulates doctors use of narcotics, therefore doctors will restrict the use of narcotics to patients who use any cannabis products. It’s too late for me, as my doctor has cut back my “narcotic” medicine, and will continue to “cut back” until I no longer use anymore. This is happening in Northern California. No, passage of prop 64 means nothing, as this is a “federal” policy.

  2. A good friend of mine has parkinson’s disease and know 1st hand how cannabis helps him with his personal fight to live with this horrible disease, cannabis needs to be removed from the schedule 1 list, this NEEDS to be done as soon as possible to remove cannabis from the schedule 1 listing on the DEA’s list of federal controlled drugs.
    Right now, too many folks, including seniors, the disabled or others who suffer from various levels of pain are being “punished” by their doctors for using ANY cannabis products, by refusing to refill anymore prescriptions for “narcotic” type medications. Doctors are telling patients, the sole reason this is happening, is because cannabis is a schedule 1 drug on the “federal” level. Schedule 1 drugs are defined as drugs with NO currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. This totally false claim!!!

  3. If we are serious about lessing the disasterous effects of opioid type medications, then we should by all means leagalize marijuana, for medicial uses at the very least. If it were to be legalized for adults say 24 and older , tax it, states use that tax revenue for social security and for Medicare/ MEDICADE. I have been a brick and block layer ,all my life. Now my doctors have put me on disability, they have prescribed me opiods for the past 10 years, of which I am now immune to now. I am not the sharpest tool in the bunch ,but I do realize there is a much better way than this. Big pharmaceutical companies are lobbing and basically buying or governments. I have no doubt that there is enough sickness to be cured without having to be so greedy as companies and ignorant as a population. Thank you all for your time and thoughts.

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