Anti-Drug Organization Admits Widespread Support for Marijuana Reform

The Partnership at Drugfree.org, formerly known as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America, released a comprehensive survey yesterday of parents’ feelings on marijuana policy reform. Although the organization coordinates with the federal government to stem marijuana use and reinforce prohibitionist laws, the survey, “Marijuana: It’s Legal, Now What?,” presents an objective look at what parents really want to see from lawmakers.

The survey found that roughly 70% of adults nationwide support medical marijuana, 50% support decriminalization, and just over 40% support legalization. When the terms were accompanied by definitions of what they would entail, support jumped by three to 11 percent. Support for each of these policy changes was even higher among parents living in Colorado and Washington. The survey also found that a majority of parents who support legalization want marijuana heavily regulated and off-limits for kids and teens, a sentiment shared by reformers and included in every major piece of legislation designed to end marijuana prohibition.

Steve Pasierb

Steve Pasierb – drug warrior

Most importantly, though, is the organization’s admission that there is widespread support for marijuana reform. Steve Pasierb, president and CEO of the Partnership, said, “The reality is that marijuana is now legalized for recreational use in the states of Colorado and Washington and it’s clear that society’s views on marijuana are evolving dramatically.” Even prohibitionists, who have spent decades fighting against sensible marijuana policies, realize that Americans are tired of the war on marijuana users. Now, they should stop standing in the way of policy reform.

8 thoughts on “Anti-Drug Organization Admits Widespread Support for Marijuana Reform”

  1. This is a smart move on their part–acknowledging reality. I think that they probably want cut their losses by acknowledging that marijuana has a completely different (lower) harm-profile than almost any other drug. (Marijuana is even safer than the Big-Time legal drugs: alcohol and tobacco.)

    The Partnership (if they’re as smart as I think they might be) is recognizing that they still have enough work in combatting Cocaine, PCP, Heroin, Methamphetamine, and RX abuse. If they quit playing games with marijuana–and trying to close the door after the horse has left the barn–they may still be able to make an argument for “drug control.” (Although, they’ve failed with the other drugs, too.)

  2. marijauana comes from a seed and god grows it no one has ever died from it all other drugs are manmade and people have died from them. i know it would help get the us out of finanical situtions if they’d just legalize it.. alcohol was once illegal now its not and its alot worse than pot, so come on goverment lets legalize it

  3. When prohibitionists fire people from their jobs because they admit they would vote for legalization and falsely accuse people of committing crimes without even administering a drug test, that’s a sign that they have gone too far. There’s some companies that are even threatening to leave Colorado because of legalization. It’s shameful that far right lunatics would destroy jobs and the economy over a plant and because of political profiling.

  4. I say make it legal for ALL and tax it!
    Tammy, ‘god’ made heroin too, it grows in beautiful Poppies!

  5. Doc… Poppies are not heroin any more than crude oil is gasoline. Without processing the poppy sap, you don’t get morphine base or heroin. MJ is usable as a medicine without even so much as drying it.

  6. It’s not just marijuana, it’s that the whole policy we use for handling drug use and abuse doesn’t work! We should end criminal possession and follow Portugal’s example and tune it to fit America>

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